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Quit Smoking - New Dissolvable Tobacco - Sticks, Orbs and Strips
2015-11-22
These alternatives to cigarettes called Camel Sticks, Camel Orbs and Camel Strips are made from tobacco that has been finely milled and food grade binders hold them together.

They can be held in the mouth or broken into a small piece and nestled between the gum and lip similar to snus or chewing tobacco. But with these dissolvable nicotine products there is no spitting. Click here to learn more about Snus.

Using these nicotine products is just trading one type of health problem for anther. They certainly won't help people stop smoking or stop a nicotine addiction. Compounding the problem they come candy-flavored which may appeal to the teenage market. The tobacco makers have used child-proof packaging in an attempt to convince the general public that it is not being marketed to children. Most teenagers can open child-proof packaging!

The dissolvable snus was originally sold in round tins similar to the original type of snus. But teachers got wise to the fact that teens were carrying it in their pockets so the tobacco makers switched to cell phone shaped tins.

Most smokers want to quit smoking cigarettes. It doesn't help that the tobacco makers come up with new products that still encourage people to continue jeopardizing their health with just another new addictive nicotine product that just helps smokers keep being hooked.

Smokers who want to quit smoking have many other ways to do it rather than switch to another nicotine addictive product. The focus today should be on coming up with new quit smoking solutions to help people get rid of their nicotine addictions for good. For more info visit General snus.
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